Thursday, November 10, 2016

First ever Mars show home goes on display in London




Not bad accommodations for prisoners. Solitary confinement inside a stone igloo on a frozen and desolate planet. Sign me up! I don't think so. Considering that the indigenous Martians hidden in caves, crevices, and massive caverns under the surface and many stealth surface facilities have far better living conditions. Not to mention the 5 star rated accommodations for human VIPs stationed up there. Oh well, it's customary when countries wish to establish a foothold on other lands to populate that land with desperate people, indigents, criminals, suckers, malcontents, and those who don't like the way certain elections have turn out. In other words, people wanting or needing a "new" place to call home, hang out; volunteers and "volunteered" as in prisoners, alike. Many countries here on earth had their beginnings, built their foundations with such groups, hords of people. And after some time passed, decades or centuries and a bunch of bumps in the road, ended up just fine. America was one of many such success stories here on earth. Mars will be a success story too...............after a bunch of foundation stones are put in place and paved over by time and a few frozen corpses. Well, for those not invited to the warm and cozy VIP lounge.

Lou Baldin   



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3924260/Your-future-house-Mars-Martian-home-reveals-life-like-red-planet.html

Your future house on Mars: First ever Martian show home reveals what life would be like on the red planet

  • Dome-like structure shows what our first homes on Mars, mined from the Martian soil that, could look like
  • The show home will remain on display at London's Royal Observatory in Greenwich until next Wednesday
  • The show is the premise of a TV series made by National Geographic, called Mars, that will air on Sunday
  • Stephen Petranek, author of 'How We'll Live on Mars' told MailOnline what it would feel like to live there 



    • The ultimate mission for mankind: to start a new civilisation on Mars.
      That's the premise of a new TV series made by National Geographic, called 'Mars', which aims to show what life could be like on the red planet. 
      In the run-up to the show's release on Sunday, London's Royal Observatory is hosting a Martian show home which has been built using materials as close to possible as those found on the red planet. 
      A model of what could be humanity's first home on Mars has gone on display today in London. The home has now been built in London using materials as close to possible as those found on the red planet, and will remain on display at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich until next Wednesday
      A model of what could be humanity's first home on Mars has gone on display today in London. The home has now been built in London using materials as close to possible as those found on the red planet, and will remain on display at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich until next Wednesday

      HOW WOULD IT BE BUILT? 

      The main structure would be constructed out of the Martian soil or regolith.
      It will also use recycled spacecraft parts, including a double air-locked entrance, all designed to protect the early settlers from Mars' unforgiving atmosphere and freezing temperatures.
      Other features, like exercise equipment, plates and cutlery to eat from and VR headsets will be 3D printed on the planet.
      The home will remain on display at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich until next Wednesday, and MailOnline was able to get a first glimpse. 
      'This is what we imagine will by a typical house, so to speak, on Mars in about the year 2037,' Stephen Petranek author of a book called 'How We'll Live on Mars' told MailOnline.
      Constructed over several months by Cardiff company Wild Creations, the 'show home' is a dome-like structure mined from the Martian soil, combined with recycled spacecraft parts, including a double air-locked entrance, all designed to protect the early settlers from Mars' unforgiving atmosphere and freezing temperatures.
      National Geographic created the home as part of its research for the new miniseries on the red planet, based on material in Mr Petranek's book.
      The home includes a trap door that leads down to an underground area, where heaters and the machine that turns carbon dioxide, which 95 per cent of the Martian atmosphere is made of, to oxygen will sit alongside more beds.
      Upstairs, a small cooking area including a microwave, where humans will cook most of their food, a bed and a computer fit neatly into the pod.
      A platform above contains pots of plants, since humans on Mars will have to grow 20 per cent of their food, Mr Petranek told MailOnline. 
      He said lettuce is a particularly good option because for people eating mainly freeze-dried food, it would provide that much loved crunch.
      Gravity would only be 38 per cent as strong as on Earth, so people would need to be wary of not letting the environment damage their bone mass, by exercising each day using 3D-printed exercise machines. 
      Outside the pod, people would need to wear a lightweight space suit that resembles a scuba diving suit. 
      As for the reasons why so much work is going into moving humans to Mars, Mr Petranek says it is not a case of curiosity but necessity.
      He told MailOnline there is a 100 per cent chance an extinction event will affect the Earth, and is almost certain to wipe out humans - whether it is an asteroid a mile long or an unbeatable virus.
      National Geographic created the home as part of its research for a new miniseries on the red planet, based on material in a book written by Stephen Petranek called 'How We'll Live on Mars'. The home includes a trap door that would lead down to an underground area, where heaters and the machine that turns carbon dioxide
      National Geographic created the home as part of its research for a new miniseries on the red planet, based on material in a book written by Stephen Petranek called 'How We'll Live on Mars'. The home includes a trap door that would lead down to an underground area, where heaters and the machine that turns carbon dioxide
      Constructed over several months by Cardiff company Wild Creations, the 'show home' is a dome-like structure mined from the Martian soil, combined with recycled spacecraft parts, including a double air-locked entrance, all designed to protect the early settlers from Mars' unforgiving atmosphere and freezing temperatures
      Constructed over several months by Cardiff company Wild Creations, the 'show home' is a dome-like structure mined from the Martian soil, combined with recycled spacecraft parts, including a double air-locked entrance, all designed to protect the early settlers from Mars' unforgiving atmosphere and freezing temperatures
      A platform above contains pots of plants, since humans on Mars will have to grow 20 per cent of their food, Mr Petranek told MailOnline
      A platform above contains pots of plants, since humans on Mars will have to grow 20 per cent of their food, Mr Petranek told MailOnline
      The home includes a trap door that leads down to an underground area, where heaters and the machine that turns carbon dioxide, which 95 per cent of the Martian atmosphere is made of, to oxygen
      The structure will resemble brickwork forged from Martian regolith that is microwaved to create sturdy building material. The home is designed to be situated in Valles Marineris, a 2,485 mile (4,000km) long, 62 mile (100km) wide system of canyons that runs along the equator of Mars
      The structure will resemble brickwork forged from Martian regolith that is microwaved to create sturdy building material. The home is designed to be situated in Valles Marineris, a 2,485 mile (4,000km) long, 62 mile (100km) wide system of canyons that runs along the equator of Mars

      WOULD YOU LIVE ON MARS? 

      National Geographic surveyed 2,000 Brits  about living on Mars.
      Almost a third, 30 per cent, said they would consider living on Mars.
      Almost a quarter, 24 per cent, said they would definitely consider living on Mars even if it was a one-way ticket with no prospect of returning to Earth. 
      The most common reason for wanting to move to Mars was Earth getting overcrowded (31.3 per cent) followed by pure adventure (31.1 per cent), with global warming and environmental issues a close third.
      As plans for Mars habitation gather significant momentum thanks to the likes of Elon Musk’s SpaceX programme, 16 per cent of those surveyed believe humans will live on the red planet by 2040.
      But, he said, if we move some people to Mars and become a multi-planetary species, the chances of humans being wiped out falls to almost zero.
      Elon Musk's SpaceX aims to land humans on the red planet on 2025, but Mr Petranek says it could take up to a couple of extra years.
      Last month, Elon Musk unveiled his most ambitious project yet - an 'Interplanetary Transport System' to take mankind to Mars in 80 days and build a sustainable human colony of a million people there.
      'What I want to achieve is make Mars seem possible, to show that we can do it in our lifetimes, and you could go,' he said at the International Astronautical Congress in Mexico.
      But ultimately, settling a whole civilisation on the planet could take much longer. 
      National Geographic surveyed 2,000 Brits about living on Mars.
      Almost a third, 30 per cent, said they would consider living on Mars.
      Almost a quarter, 24 per cent, said they would definitely consider living on Mars even if it was a one-way ticket with no prospect of returning to Earth. 
      The most common reason for wanting to move to Mars was Earth getting overcrowded (31.3 per cent) followed by pure adventure (31.1 per cent), with global warming and environmental issues a close third.
      As plans for Mars habitation gather significant momentum thanks to the likes of Elon Musk’s SpaceX programme, 16 per cent of those surveyed believe humans will live on the red planet by 2040. 


      Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3924260/Your-future-house-Mars-Martian-home-reveals-life-like-red-planet.html#ixzz4PfNsk000
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